Archive for October, 2012

CNA: Anglican archbishop suggests contemplation for reaching post-Christian world

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

Below is an excerpt of a report from CNA about a recent address by the Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams to the synod of Catholic bishops on the New Evangelisation.

“Anglican Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams addressed the synod of Catholic bishops on the New Evangelisation about the importance of contemplation for reaching people in a post-Christian world.

“To be contemplative as Christ is contemplative is to be open to all the fullness that the Father wishes to pour into our hearts,” the archbishop said Oct. 10. “With our minds made still and ready to receive, with our self-generated fantasies about God and ourselves reduced to silence, we are at last at the point where we may begin to grow.”

He urged Christians to show to the world “the face of a humanity in endless growth towards love” and a humanity “so delighted and engaged” by the glory of God, stressing its importance for evangelization.

The Synod of Bishops on the New Evangelization is meeting at the Vatican over the next three weeks to consider how to evangelize the contemporary world, especially those who are baptized but have drifted away from the Church.

Archbishop Williams told the synod that evangelization is “always an overflow of something else,” like the journey to maturity in Jesus Christ led by the Holy Spirit.

“To put it boldly, contemplation is the only ultimate answer to the unreal and insane world that our financial systems and our advertising culture and our chaotic and unexamined emotions encourage us to inhabit,” the Anglican archbishop said.”

From CNA

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CNS: Catholic leaders – Nobel Prize for medicine a triumph for ethics

Wednesday, October 10th, 2012

Below is an excerpt of a report on the CNS website about the awarding of a Nobel Prize to two pioneers of adult stem cell research.

“Catholic leaders in Europe hailed the decision to give a Nobel Prize to two pioneers of adult stem-cell research as a triumph for ethics.

A statement from the Commission of the Bishops’ Conferences of the European Community, known as COMECE, said that awarding the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka represented an “important milestone” in recognizing the superior potential of adult stem-cell research over destructive experimentation on human embryonic stem cells.

The Anscombe Bioethics Centre, an institute serving the Catholic Church in the United Kingdom and Ireland, also described the award as an “achievement of great ethical significance.”

“This technique offers hope of progress in stem-cell research without relying on the unethical destruction of human embryos,” said David Jones, director of the Anscombe center in Oxford, England.

“The past attempts to clone human embryos and the bizarre experiments to create admixed human-nonhuman embryos have delivered nothing,” he said.

“In contrast, the transformation of adult cells into stem cells is making great progress,” he continued. “This is science at its best: both beautiful and ethical.”

By Simon Caldwell

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